FullSizeRender (22)

While carrying around a bulky DSLR camera and telephoto lens might never be a thing of the past, it’s safe to say that most travel writers can take photos with their iPhone that will “wow” their social media audiences and be of image quality that is suitable for many print magazines.

Note that these hacks may not be present if you don’t have the latest iOS.

Each of the hacks below begin with “Open your camera app.”

1. The Rule of Thirds. Photo composition is all important, and many people still make the mistake of “centering” their subject. Instead, use the rule of thirds. Place your subject to the far left or right, top or bottom. Turn on your camera’s grid lines to help you with this.

2. Set your focus and exposure. Once you’ve composed your shot, touch the element on the iPhone screen that you want to make sure is in focus.  A “sun” icon will appear in the center of the screen, bisected by a thin yellow line. Swipe up with your finger to let more light in (increase exposure) or down to decrease exposure. You’ll be able to see the result on your phone screen immediately.  When it looks good to you, take the shot.

3. Crop the photo. Touch the Edit tool on the top or bottom of your screen. Then at the bottom left of your screen, touch the icon that looks like a square. This is your crop button. Choose the size of the image you want, then drag the resulting square/rectangle into position on the photo, and then touch Done.

4. Burst Shots to capture movement. If you’re trying to do an action shot, try using burst mode. The camera will continue to take photos as long as you hold your finger over the “take photo” button. You can then review to see which you like the best. One word of caution, however, is that the newer iPhones have lightning fast burst and will take a large number of shots in just a matter of seconds.

5. Photography within Video. If you’re filming a video, you may want to take a still photograph simultaneously. The photo will be of better quality than taking a screen capture from the video later on.

Switch your camera setting to video, and start recording as you normally would. To the left of the stop/start video button is the photo button. Simply touch the button with your finger to take a photo, while the video still records.

6. Panorama Shots. A panorama of a street scene, Christmas market or nature scene shows off a location in some ways better than a regular shot.

With your camera app open, slide the selections to the left until Pano is highlighted. You’ll see an arrow on the screen that allows you to set the panorama to go from right to left. Touch the arrow and it will reverse and let you pan from left to right. Then slowly pan your phone until the arrow is at the end of the line and touch the photo button again to stop. You can then use the edit button functions to adjust lighting, color and special filter effects.

7. Using your headphones to take a photo. There are situations where you may wish you had some sort of a remote camera shutter switch to keep camera shake to a minimum. For those times simply use your iPhone headphones. After inserting the plug into your iPhone, you can use the “+” volume button located on the headphone cord to take your photos.

8. An app to share a photo story page. You, and your Followers will love the Storehouse app. All you need to do is select the photos and videos you want to put into a chronological “story” (from your camera roll or from a storage location) and the app generates a customizable page featuring all of these elements in the order you want them. Share the page link to your Facebook and Twitter pages and send it out via Email as well.

9. Flipagram is a free app that is similar to Storehouse. Rather than creating a page with all your photos, however, it makes them into a sort of slideshow, and you can add music to it. (Short clips of music are free to use, but if you want longer music you’ll need to make an in-app purchase.)

10. Fyuse (pronounced “fuse” and a play on the word “fusion”) allows you to turn any shot into a “3D” image. It’s spatial photography which allows the viewer to see the same image from different angles. Simply rotate the phone to see the movement that you created.

Author Bio:  This post was written by Ron Stern for TBEX sponsor, Hospitality21.